This category includes all martial arts of Chinese origin, often known in the West as "Kung Fu." It is the generic name for literally hundreds of individual Chinese fighting arts, both "internal" and "external," ancient and of relatively recent invention.
Please submit only sites with information on Kung Fu that has a global interest here. To be listed here the site must have information on more than one style of Kung Fu or if there is no style category that exists yet.

Also please note: School sites should be submitted to Schools and Instruction and organization sites to Organizations. They should not be submitted here, even if they contain news and information or resources.

Crane (He Quan) The arts of Crane Kung Fu have a varied and rich history. At least two distinct styles of Crane Boxing originated in Fujian province of mainland China, and a third is said to have come from Tibet. Many Martial Arts historians have traced the development of Okinawan Karate from roots in Baihe Quan or White Crane Boxing. Characteristics of this system include wide-armed, wing-like movements, high kicking, and the barehand crane's beak. The websites in this category continue the ancient traditions of Crane Kung Fu.
Following the example of the Shaolin category this will solve the problem of large associations who also have many local branch clubs and web sites.
Eagle Claw (Ying Zhao) A highly specialized art of Kung Fu, Eagle Claw is characterized by its use of the eagle talon hand form as the primary weapon, used to attack the eyes, throat and occasionally the groin. Strikes and grappling are the primary attack modes, although Eagle Claw contains excellent leg sweeps and very efficient blocks. Although rare, there are still high-level practitioners of this art as represented by the websites below.
Hung Gar (Hong Jia Quan) A powerful and effective family style originating in Guangzhou (Canton), the art known popularly as Hung Gar is characterized by deeply rooted stances and brutally effective grab and strike combinations. Favored by streetfighters as well as those looking for efficient self-defense, this once private style has spread around the world -- as represented by the websites listed here.
The internal styles of the Chinese martial arts.
Please submit only sites dealing with the history, philosophy and practise of the traditional Chinese martial art of Ba ji ch''uan.

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While not a true style of Kung Fu, this specialized art form is the subject of so much speculation and misinformation that it deserves its own category. Divided into "hard" and "soft" approaches, the art of Iron Palm involves conditioning the hand in order to both deliver and withstand devastating strikes. The breaking power of Iron Palm is legendary. Visit the websites listed here for more information.
Jow Ga is widely practiced all over the world with its origins in the legendary Shaolin temples of Ancient China. Its main founder, Jow Lung, intensively studied both Northern and Southern Shaolin systems of Kung Fu in his youth, and combined the skills and practical techniques of the two systems to create a balanced hard and soft style of Kung Fu. Strong, low stances, a distinct dexterity in footwork, ground and aerial techniques, as well as a wide range of kicking and hand techniques all point to an influence of the Hung Gar and Choy Gar styles of Kung Fu. Jow Ga is also renowned for its animal forms such as tiger, crane, leopard, cougar, eagle, dragon, and phoenix.
Links to sites about Praying Mantis (Tang Lang) styles of Kung Fu. Both Northern and Southern styles included.
This category is for Kung Fu organizations, federations, and associations which are of a general aspect to Kung Fu or organizations for specific styles for which no category exists.
If your organization represents one specific style of Kung Fu for which a sub-category exist in the main Kung Fu category, please submit your organization site there. Otherwise, submit it here.
This category is for schools as well as training and instructional programs which are of a general aspect to Kung Fu, or schools for specific Kung Fu style for which no category exists.
If your school teaches one specific style of Kung Fu for which a sub-category exist in the main Kung Fu category, please submit your school site there. Otherwise, choose the most appropriate regional sub-category within this category.
Easily the most famous of the styles of Chinese Kung Fu, Shaolin Boxing originated at the Shaolin Temple on Song Mountain in Henan Province. Introduced by the legendary Indian monk Boddhidharma, the exercises and martial techniques of Shaolin became world famous for their effectiveness. The Shaolin Temples became a repository and exchange for Kung Fu techniques, and the styles and variations developed there over the centuries are countless. The websites listed within this category carry on the time-honored traditions of the arts of the Shaolin.
Shuai Chiao (Shuai Jiao) One of the most ancient of the arts of Kung Fu, Shuai Chiao wrestling is thought to be the fountainhead of Japanese Jiujitsu, Judo and even Sumo. Characterized by powerful throws and takedowns, Shuai Chiao has remained a highly popular style of effective fighting since the Qing Dynasty.
Often shrouded in mystery fed by popular Chinese novels and movies, much of the details about the origins of White Eyebrow have become too confused to quote reliably. According to legend, this style was created by the Daoist master Baimei in Sichuan during the Qing Dynasty. It is characterized by powerful strikes and coordinated hand forms. The legacy of White Eyebrow continues through the work of websites such as those listed here.
Wing Chun is the name of a system of martial arts developed in southern China approximately 300 years ago. Its originator, the Buddhist nun Ng Mui, was a master of Shaolin Kung Fu and used this knowledge to invent a way to take advantage of the weaknesses inherent in the other Shaolin systems. This new system was well-guarded and passed on to only a few, very dedicated students. Later, the style became known as Wing Chun, after Ng Mui's first student, a woman named Yim Wing Chun.
Please submit only sites with information on Wing Chun that has a global interest here.

Also please note: School sites should be submitted to Schools and Instruction and organization sites to Organizations. They should not be submitted here, even if they contain news and information or resources.

Category for Modern and Contemporary Wushu.
Suggest only sites about Modern and Contemporary Wushu.